Child Passenger Safety Week

Did you know that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children 1-12 years old?  According to, from 2006 to 2010, 4,028 children (age 12 and younger in a passenger vehicle) were killed and an estimated 660,000 were injured, in motor vehicle traffic crashes – more than the entire population of Boston, Massachusetts.  Many times deaths and injuries can be prevented by proper use of car seats, booster seats, and seat belts.

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At Boston Medical Center (BMC), the Department of Surgery, Section of Trauma and the Department of Public Safety collaborate on a child passenger safety program.  The program includes trained officers, called Child Passenger Safety Technicians, who complete multiple car seat fit checks and installations each week.  Referrals come from the inpatient wards as well as the community.  For more information please call our Injury Prevention Coordinator, Lisa Allee, at 617-414-8007 or visit our website at

*Courtesy of and the Ad Council

Boston Medical Center’s Trauma Program 2014 Annual Report

Friends of Boston Trauma:

We are delighted in providing you our Annual Report from the Trauma and Acute Care Surgery Service.  Overall, it was a good year.  Business was up and the renovations around the campus continue to make us more efficient and competitive.  As always we appreciate your support and participation in caring for the ill and injured in our community and region.

2014 Trauma Services Annual Report

Please also visit our website at for copies of our past and present annual reports.

Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) Department of Surgery are seeking a new faculty member in the Section of Acute Care & Trauma Surgery/Surgical Critical Care

Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) Department of Surgery are seeking a new faculty member in the Section of Acute Care & Trauma Surgery/Surgical Critical Care.

BMC is a 496-bed academic medical center located in Boston’s historic South End. BMC provides a full range of adult and pediatric services, from primary care and family medicine to advanced specialty care. Emphasizing community-based care, BMC is committed to providing consistently excellent and accessible health services to all—and is the largest safety-net hospital in New England.

BMC is the principal teaching affiliate of Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). BUSM is highly ranked and committed to urban and international health and has recognized leader in groundbreaking medical research.

Boston Medical Center includes expertise in both adult and pediatric trauma and has approximately 2,000 trauma team activations per year.  BMC is the largest and busiest provider of trauma and emergency services in New England. It is the longest continuously verified Level I trauma program in the City of Boston and has earned the reputation of one of the country’s finest programs as one of several Centers of Excellence at Boston Medical Center.

We ask that candidates who wish to be considered send a CV and cover letter describing the experiences that qualify them for our position. The successful candidate will be ABS board eligible or certified in Surgery and Surgical Critical Care. Please send all materials directly to: Gerard Doherty, MD, Utley Professor and Chair of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine and Surgeon-in-Chief, Boston Medical Center via email to Please include “Acute Care & Trauma Surgery Position” in the subject line.

Boston University and Boston Medical Center are equal opportunity employers, committed to their common mission of improving the health of Boston’s residents while adhering to the highest standards of academic medicine.

BMC and BUSM are affirmative action/equal employment employers.
Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Heatstroke Safety

heatstroke photo

*photo courtesy of Safe Kids Worldwide

As the summer goes on, it seems as though more and more cases of children being left alone in hot cars are flooding the media with tragic stories.  Far too many children are being left in hot cars by themselves, and leaving a child alone in a car can lead to serious injury or even death from heatstroke.  This year, according to, there have already been 12 cases of child vehicular heatstroke deaths.  On average, there have been 38 deaths per year since 1998.

Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash vehicle-related deaths for children, according to Safe Kids Worldwide.  Young children are particularly at risk, as their bodies heat up three to five times faster than adults.  These heatstroke deaths and related injuries are 100 percent preventable.

Safe Kids Worldwide shares tips on how to reduce the number of deaths from heatstroke by remembering to ACT:

A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.

C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine.

T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.

“Heatstroke prevention is extremely important”, says Lisa Allee, MSW, LICSW, Injury Prevention Coordinator in BMC’s Trauma Section. “I tell parents to leave their purse or briefcase in the back seat as a reminder to check the back of the automobile to prevent heatstroke deaths when I install car seats as part of our Child Passenger Safety Program here at BMC.”

To learn more about heatstroke, please visit:

To learn more about the Child Passenger Safety Program at Boston Medical Center, please visit:

BMC Patient Survives a Serious Cycling Crash

patient testimonial

(Photo of Ken and his wife Joette)


On July 3, 2015, while on his second-to-last training ride near his home in New Hampshire for an upcoming seven-day, 700 mile bike race across the state of Iowa, Harry “Ken” Kimball suddenly lost control and fell off of his bike trying to avoid a car. Thankfully, Ken’s riding partner was with him and stayed until emergency services arrived. Ken was initially taken to Parkland Medical Center in Derry, New Hampshire, where they recognized the severity of his injuries and prepared him for MedFlight transfer to Boston Medical Center (BMC).

When he arrived at BMC, Ken was met by trauma surgeon, George Kasotakis, MD, and the rest of the trauma team. He was found to have multiple rib fractures and “flail chest”, a type of severe chest wall trauma where ribs are broken in multiple places, which potentially complicates the recovery process.

Shortly after arriving to BMC he underwent an innovative surgical procedure to reconstruct his unstable chest wall. “Rib fixation is a fairly novel surgical procedure, typically offered to patients with severe or unstable rib fractures, which almost immediately helps them breathe better and easier”, says Kasotakis. Within a day, Ken was weaned off the ventilator and began to show signs of improvement in his ability to breathe.

As Ken is gaining strength and is on the road to recovery he and his family are extremely thankful for the care that they have received from the team at BMC. “The caregivers have been amazing”, says Ken. “They have been a huge part of maintaining my positive mentality. The communication, collaboration and investment in my well-being has been a blessing.”

In addition to the world-class care that he and his wife Joette describe receiving, Ken reflects on how much the staff impacted his recovery. “They just love their jobs and it’s really apparent in the care they deliver to their patients no matter what brought them in”, says Ken. Joette is thankful for how she and her family were treated with genuine care and compassion. “The level of professionalism is exceptional among staff”, says Joette.

Although Ken sustained significant and potentially life threatening injuries, he says, “I genuinely believe I would not be alive today if it were not for the exceptional care I received from the staff here at BMC.”

Eye Injury Prevention

Did you know that 90% of all eye related injuries could be prevented simply by wearing protective eyewear?  Protective eyewear is recommended for household projects and activities around the home, for many occupations and different sports activities.  More than 40% of eye injuries that occur every year are related to sports and recreational activities.  In addition, eyes can also be damaged by sun exposure, not just chemicals, dust, or objects.  According to a national survey by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, only 35% of respondents said they always wear protective eyewear when performing home repairs or maintenance; even fewer do so while playing sports.

Jean Ramsey, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine and a physician here at Boston Medical Center says “We regularly see children referred from the Emergency Room who have suffered an eye injury from organized sports such as baseball and basketball.  Oftentimes it is a finger in the eye, dust, or the ball itself strikes the eye.  These injuries can be devastating at times.  Protective eyewear would prevent nearly all of these injuries.”

For more information on eye injury prevention and different types of eye protection, please visit:

Older Adult and Teen Driving Lecture – Lisa Allee, MSW, LICSW

Lisa @ MGH 2

We kicked off Injury Prevention Month on April 1st with an invited lecture provided to the Massachusetts General Hospital’s Trauma and Critical Care group on Older Adult and Teen Driving by our Injury Prevention Coordinator at Boston Medical Center, Lisa Allee, MSW, LICSW.

During her informative presentation, Lisa went over current statistics related to older adult and teen driving and provided information on what can be done to help reduce crashes and ultimately the death rates resulting from these crashes.

Did you know that approximately 15 older adults die, and 500 are injured every day due to motor vehicle crashes here in the United States?  Older adults accounted for 17% of all traffic fatalities in 2012.  Healthcare providers have an ability to help reduce these rates, along with friends and family members of older adult drivers.

Also, did you know that nationally, approximately seven teens between the ages of 16-19 died every day in 2011 due to motor vehicle crashes and teen drivers in that age group are three times more likely to be in a fatal crash than drivers over the age of 20? It turns out that speed, alcohol and lack of seat belt use are some of the highest risk factors for teen drivers.

Here at BMC we see victims of motor vehicle crashes day in and day out and the Injury Prevention Team is dedicated to research, advocacy and programming aimed at reducing these alarming statistics.

For more information on Older Adult and Teen driving risks and what you can do please visit the CDC’s website (Older Adult and Teen driving).


National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Department of Transportation (US). Traffic Safety Facts 2008: Older Population. Washington (DC): NHTSA; 2009 [cited 2011 Feb 25].

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic Safety Facts: 2012 Occupant Protection. Washington, D.C.: US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: 2014. Publication no. DOT-HS-811-892. [cited 2014 Sept 8].

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Fatality facts: teenagers 2012. Arlington (VA): The Institute; 2012 [cited 2014 Sept 29].